Expect Gold to Deliver Another Record in 2013

No two bull markets are ever the same, and gold is no exception.

During the last secular gold bull market in the 1970s, gold rose from $35 in 1968 all the way to $200 by late 1974.

Then the unthinkable happened. Between late 1974 and mid-1976, gold prices were cut in half, dropping from about $200 to $100.

At the time, many gold investors sold out in disgust, never to return.

But then a funny thing occurred. Gold prices started to climb again, rising from $100 in mid-1976 all the way to $800 by January 1980.

And anyone who was fortunate enough to own gold at $35 earned better than 20 times their investment in just 12 years.

Twenty-one years later, a new bull market began. Since 2001, gold has consistently performed in what now appears to be a record-setting run.

In fact, since 2001 the average return on gold is now just shy of 18% annually over the last 11 years.

I know of no other major asset that has turned in this kind of performance – ever. This rise in gold prices is simply unmatched.

This is what a stealth bull market looks like, one that I fully expect will keep powering on.

Now, let's have a look at where gold prices might be headed in 2013...

2013 Gold Price Forecast

Gold began the year at $1,600 an ounce. Should we get average returns in this calendar year as well, gold could finish 2012 around $1,880. At those levels, gold prices would begin 2013 just shy of the all-time high set last year, right around the $1,900 mark.

If we assume an average return again next year, then gold could reach $2,200 or better in 2013. In fact, I believe $2,200 gold is quite likely in 2013.

After all, none of the fundamentals supporting gold prices have gone away. Instead, they've only become even more entrenched.

In fact, here are five factors I've identified that will power the gold bull market upwards for several more years to come.

The Feverish Growth of Fiat Money: Take a look at this chart. It's a picture that tells you what you need to know about fiat money. As you can see, the U.S. and most of the developed world is printing money much faster than the amount of new gold being brought to the market. Here's the thing: The chart only shows you what was created in an hour. Imagine what the same chart would look like if it were a year. Better yet, how about five years -- or more. The bottom line is that the printing presses are bullish for gold.

The Feverish Demand For Gold: As central banks continue to print, individuals are continuing to feverishly buy gold, especially in the world's two most populous nations, China and India, which in 2002 accounted for 23% of world gold demand. Today, just these two nations alone make up nearly half of all demand at 47%. This is just the beginning.

 

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