Will we see consolidation in gold mining industry?

As the gold mining sector plunges to the end of a cyclical bear market, one wonders if this ongoing selling climax will precipitate a catalyst for more mergers and acquisitions in the industry. The last 12 years tells us that these transactions tend to follow the market itself but with a lag. Peaks in M&A activity (in global mining) in terms of number of transactions and value occurred in 2006-2007 and 2010-2011 while troughs occurred in 2002 and 2008-2009. According to Ernst & Young, 2012 had the lowest number of global mining deals since 2008 and the lowest in terms of value since 2009. On a smaller microeconomic level, the current depths of the junior mining industry and low share prices across the board should provide a catalyst for more deal flow. Going forward I believe we will see industry consolidation but in two separate different phases which will produce different winners.

The first phase should begin soon but will be the smaller phase. First we should note that one reason it will be the smaller phase is because the market is forcing the major producers to focus on execution, cash flow generation and dividend growth rather than production growth itself. On a per share basis, the majors have done a lousy job in terms of production growth. At the same time, many majors have new CEO’s who are unlikely to immediately take the kind of risks that doomed their predecessors. Thus, don’t expect the majors to participate much in this initial phase.

The established small and mid-tier companies who have growth mandates and posses financial strength and operational expertise will look to acquire quality assets on the cheap or distressed assets for pennies on the dollar. Obviously, the entire gold mining sector is going for fire sale prices right now and especially the juniors. These companies seeking growth will first look to see if quality junior-owned assets can be bought at a significant discount. Second, they will look to acquire the junior companies that currently operate underperforming mines (the distressed assets) which could be improved with an injection of more capital or technical expertise.

The largest driver of this initial consolidation will be the failure of a high percentage of junior companies. Through the brilliant work of John Kaiser we know that the junior sector will shrink considerably in a Darwinian sort of way. Simply put, too many of these companies have marginal prospects and will not be able to raise the capital to survive this difficult environment.

The second phase won’t begin until well after we see gold stocks (i.e GDX, HUI) break to new all-time highs and confirm the breakout. This phase is at least a few years away and could somewhat resemble the pac-man scenario, which Eric King wrote about in 2004.  Let me explain.

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